Diplomatic and International Relations – America in the 19th-21st Centuries

Diplomatic and International Relations – America in the 19th-21st Centuries
2019-05-27 KKI
On 13 May 2019, the Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade organized its most recent event, the launch of the book titled Diplomatic and International Relations – America in the 19th-21st Centuries, with the invited guests Mr. Tamás Magyarics, professor of the Department of American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, and Mr. Sándor Gyula Nagy, deputy director of the Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade. Moderator tasks were performed by Mr. András Lénárt, assistant professor at the Department of Hispanic Studies of the University of Szeged.

After a brief introduction, the conversation started with the question of moderator on how all the studies on the entire American continent could get into a single volume, and what is the reason that – although it is only in foreign scientific circles – the terminology “The Americas” has been started to use . Both invited guests to agree that “America”, “American” expressions – albeit spread in public discourse – not only cover the United States and its inhabitants, and it would be time to use the word “the Americans” in Hungarian. Mr. Tamás Magyarics emphasized the economic and political leader role of the US in the separation of the Northern and Southern parts of the continent. All this was supported by Mr. Sándor Gyula Nagy with the idea that Latin America is still regarded as the “back yard” of the US, mainly due to the unequal relationship between the two regions. However, he also noted that Latin Americans have a great impact on the United States, especially through immigrants. After all this, the word has been directed to the book that is being presented, and its authors and editors were in the circle of the audience.

The papers in the study book cover a wide range of topics in terms of their approach, which is why it is a very interesting and complementary piece of Hungarian literature. The papers in this publication cover economic policy issues, ranging from diplomatic and political history to US government interest groups and their current political situation, and each paper tries to analyze from a new perspective the topics that are usually much discussed. Mr. András Lénárt’s next question was about future trends in US foreign policy. In the opinion of Mr. Tamás Magyarics, although it lost much of his power hegemony, the United States, despite the remarkable global economic reorganization, is not declining and will probably rely more on its regional allies in the future. In this connection, Mr. Sándor Gyula Nagy emphasized that the cultural influence of the US is still the most significant in Latin America, and the market loss for China has not been so far, and will no longer be so decisive that the United States should worry. Finally, the relationship between Latin America and the European Union and Hungary has become the focus of the conversation. There was a consensus on the issue that no decisive change is expected in this matter, and it would make sense for Hungary to strengthen its ties with Latin America, particularly in the field of cultural diplomacy and service exports. The book presentation ended with audience questions.